Headache Diary

A healthcare provider may recommend keeping a diary of headache frequency to help identify possible triggers. Each time you have a headache, write down the time, place, and what you were doing when it started. By documenting how often you get headaches, their severity, and the possible relationship to outside factors, your healthcare provider can better determine the best treatment option for you.

How to Keep a Headache Diary

For people with frequent headaches or who have been diagnosed with migraines, a healthcare provider many recommend keeping a headache diary. This is one way to help understand possible headache triggers. This tool allows you to clearly capture, in a standardized way, how often you get headaches; how severe they are; and the possible relationship to physical, emotional, or environmental factors.
 
Each time you have a headache, write down the time of day, the point in your menstrual cycle (for women), where you are at the time, and what you were doing when the headache started. Besides helping you understand possible triggers, a headache diary will help your healthcare provider better understand your headaches. This will also allow headache treatment options to be tailored to your particular situation.
 

Sample Headache Diary

The following is a sample diary that you can use to track your headaches.
 
 
Date
During Menses? (Yes/No)
Time Began
(a.m/p.m.)
Severity
(Score)*
Psychological and
Physical FactorsA
Chemical Exposure B
Describe Location/
Type of Pain
Medication Taken, Dosage
Time Ended
(a.m./p.m.)
Relief
(Score)**
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Severity Scale *
Relief Scale **
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
None
Mild
Can't work
Worst, can't do anything
Getting worse
Same, unchanged
Better
Totally better
A. Psychological and Physical Factors
 
B. Chemical Exposure
 
 
1 – Emotional upset (family or friends)
2 – Emotional upset (occupational)
3 – Business failure
4 – Business success
5 – Vacation days
6 – Weekend
7 – Strenuous exercise
8 – Strenuous labor
9 – High-altitude location (flight)
10 – Anticipation anxiety
11 – Serious crisis
12 – Postcrisis period
 
 
13 – New job/position
14 – Moved/housing change
15 – Menstrual days
16 – Physical illness
17 – Oversleeping
18 – Weather
19 – Fasting
20 – Missing a meal
21 – Lack of sleep
22 – Studying
23 – Television/VCR >2 hours
24 – Other:___________________
 
 
A – Ripened cheeses (or pizza)
B – Herring
C – Chocolate
D – Red vinegar
E – Fermented foods (pickled or marinated, sour cream, yogurt)
F – Freshly baked yeast breads, cakes
G – Nuts, peanut butter
H – Monosodium glutamate (Asian food)
I – Pods or broad beans
J – Onions
K – Canned figs
 
 
L – Citrus fruits
M – Bananas
N – Pork
O – Caffeinated beverages (including sodas)
P – Avocado
Q – Smoked or cured sausage, cured cold cuts
R – Chicken livers
S – Wine
T – Alcohol
U – Beer
V – Drugs (specify):_________________
Know the Signs - Concussion Safety

Headache

Referring Pages:
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.